Wermerson Orthodontics Blog

Posts for tag: Orthodontists

 

Tips For Managing The Occasional Orthodontic Discomfort

Do you have a plan if something unexpected happens while in braces? If not, this might be a good read to help you with some preparation tips. It also helps to know the difference between a minor issue that can wait until your next regular appointment and a more serious issue that you’ll want to be seen earlier to get you out of discomfort.

 

Common Orthodontic Discomfort

Some of the common setbacks patients experience with their orthodontic appliances include a bracket coming loose from a tooth, discomfort from something poking into the cheeks, lips, or gums, and toothaches.

  • If a bracket breaks loose, give Wermerson Orthodontics a call to schedule a comfort visit to replace the bracket. Leaving it until the next regularly scheduled appointment can interfere with your treatment plan and may even mean your braces removal day will get pushed back!
  • If a bracket or archwire is poking you, sometimes you can fix it at home by gently pushing the protruding part in with a pencil eraser so that it’s more out of the way. You can also use orthodontic wax to cover the uncomfortable spot. If it’s still an issue or if it’s giving you a lot of trouble, give Wermerson Orthodontics a call and we can recommend other steps to try at home or schedule a comfort visit with you.
  • In the case of general toothaches as the braces apply pressure to your teeth, this is usually temporary pressure (a few days), and you can manage it with over-the-counter painkillers and by swishing warm saltwater around in your mouth. If the pain remains or gets worse, it could be a more serious problem and you should contact Wermerson Orthodontics for us to evaluate.

 

What Qualifies as Major Orthodontic Emergency?

Most patients will never have to deal with a major orthodontic emergency, but it’s still a good idea to be prepared so that you know what to do if it happens. Here are the three major orthodontic emergencies:

  • Trauma to the mouth, teeth, or face that has broken off brackets or the wire from a fall or sports injury.  Often when this happens the first stop will be to the medical emergency room to check for any other trauma and your general dentist to fix any broken teeth that may have been caused by the accident.  Throughout the recovery process keep Wermerson Orthodontics informed so we can help with getting your orthodontic treatment back on track after all medical issues have been addressed.

 

Bring Us Your Questions and Concerns

It’s always a good idea to keep extra rubber bands and orthodontic wax handy so that you can quickly address minor issues.  Plan to keep our practice’s phone number in your contacts list should the need to ask a question arises. If you have any questions about how to deal with potential problems or emergencies, go ahead and give us a call today at 605-274-0555!

 

We look forward to seeing you smile!

 

Call us today to schedule a consultation with Dr. Chris Wermerson.

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions

What Causes Crooked Teeth?

WHY DO ADULT TEETH come in crooked so often even though baby teeth always seem to be straight?

It turns out that a number of different factors can contribute to bad bites and poor alignment in adult teeth, from age to genetics to the daily habits we don’t even think about.

 

The Soft Foods Theory And Dental Alignment

Experts are still debating the causes of crooked teeth, but archeologists have supplied one of the leading theories: the Soft Foods Theory. Essentially, the idea here is that our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate foods that were much tougher than what we eat now, which stimulated bone growth in their jaws, giving their teeth a solid foundation to come in straight.

This theory suggests that modern people have crooked teeth more often because our soft, processed food doesn’t encourage as much jaw bone growth and because we’re missing some of the vitamins and minerals that help bones and teeth grow. (Don’t feel too jealous of those strong jaws, though, because the tradeoff was that their teeth wore out much faster.)

 

Genetic Ties That Bind

Aside from the theorized effects of soft foods on dental alignment, our teeth are also affected by our genes. A child who inherits a small jaw from Mom and big teeth from Dad is going to have a problem with crowding, and children whose parents wore braces will likely also need them.

 

Daily Habits Versus Dental Alignment

It would be pretty hard to stick to a hunter-gatherer diet these days and we have no control over our own genes, but there is one factor we can control when it comes to how straight or crooked our teeth are, and that’s daily habits. Thumb sucking, mouth breathing, tongue thrusting, and even the simple action of resting your chin on your hand all contribute to shifting teeth.

Tongue thrusting, if you aren’t familiar, is the way babies swallow — pressing the tongue against the front teeth instead of the roof of the mouth. It’s perfectly normal for them, but we’re supposed to grow out of it. People who continue to tongue thrust after babyhood put a lot of pressure on their front teeth, causing them to shift. Special orthodontic appliances can help break the habit.

 

Mesial Drift: Dental Alignment Changing As We Age

Our teeth come into contact with each other countless times over decades of chewing and talking, and this can wear away at the sides of each tooth where it touches its neighbors. Teeth end up taking up less space from side to side, and then they scoot closer together, gradually pushing towards the front. This is mesial drift, which happens to most of us as we age, whether or not we’ve had braces in the past!

 

A Job For The Orthodontist

No matter what’s causing problems with bite or crowding, orthodontic treatment is the solution. If you’re worried about your dental alignment or that of a family member, contact Wermerson Orthodontics to set up a complimentary consultation so that we can take a look. Having straight teeth isn’t just about appearances; it’s about having healthier teeth that can do their job properly!

We look forward to seeing you smile!

 

Call us today to schedule a consultation with Dr. Chris Wermerson.

 

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555
 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions

MAINTAINING GOOD DENTAL health isn’t just about the quantity of your brushing — it’s also about the quality. There are several mistakes many of us make when brushing our teeth, whether because we’re using the wrong tools or because we’re using the right tools the wrong way.

1. Keeping A Toothbrush Too Long

How long has it been since you got a new toothbrush? The American Dental Association recommends replacing your toothbrush at least three times a year, because broken, frayed bristles can’t do as good of a job of keeping your teeth clean.

2. Racing Through Your Brushing

The average time people spend brushing their teeth is 45 seconds, which obviously falls far short of the full two minutes recommended. If you’re having trouble making it through two whole minutes, try setting a timer or playing a song.

3. Brushing Too Hard

You might assume that the harder you brush, the cleaner your teeth will get, but you really only need gentle pressure to scrub the leftover food and bacteria away. If you brush much harder than that, you risk damaging your gum tissue.

4. Using A Hard-Bristled Brush

Like brushing too hard, using a toothbrush with hard bristles can do more harm than good, especially to gum tissue. Talk to us if you’re not sure which type of bristles your toothbrush should have.

5. Brushing Immediately After Eating

A common mistake people make when they’re trying to take good care of their teeth is to immediately brush them after a meal. Acidic foods and drinks temporarily weaken our tooth enamel, and brushing right away can cause damage. This is why we should wait at least half an hour to brush so that our saliva has time to neutralize things.

6. Poor Toothbrush Storage

Is your toothbrush smelly? Do you store it somewhere it can get plenty of air, or do you put it in a case where it never really dries out? Bacteria love moist environments, so the best thing we can do to keep our toothbrushes clean is to store them upright somewhere they can air dry between uses.

7. Bad Brushing Technique

Even brushing for two full minutes twice a day with the best toothbrush with the perfect bristle firmness won’t do much for your teeth if your technique is off. Remember that you’re brushing to get plaque and food particles out of the gumline, so hold your brush at a 45° angle to the gums and gently sweep the bristles in small circular motions. Do this at least 15 times in each area of the mouth, on the tongue side and outside of the teeth, and don’t forget the chewing surfaces!

Come To Us With Your Tooth Brushing Questions

If you want to learn more about good brushing technique, toothbrush storage, or how to pick the perfect toothbrush for you, just give us a call! We want to make sure that all of our patients have the right tools and knowledge to keep their teeth healthy for life!

We look forward to seeing you at your next appointment!

 

Contact us to schedule your complimentary orthodontic evaluation today!

 

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555
 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions

What’s In That Drink?

You probably already know that soda is chock full of sugar, but did you know that it’s also highly acidic? For reference, stomach acid, one of the strongest acids, has a pH of 1.5, whereas water is neutral at a pH of 7. Soda ranges in acidity from RC Cola with a pH of 2.387 to Mug root beer with a pH of 4.038. The strong acidity from citric and phosphoric acids is actually the reason for all the sugar—without it, soda would be too sour to drink!

Effects On Teeth

The sugar and acid in soda launch a two-pronged attack on your oral health. Sugar is bacteria’s favorite food, so you’re giving the bacteria in your mouth a feast when you drink anything full of sugar, which allows them to reproduce faster. You’ll end up with bad breath and a higher risk of cavities as a result.

As for the acid, the protective enamel coating your teeth is vulnerable from the first swig. Even the least acidic sodas like root beer aren’t safe, because enamel begins to dissolve at a pH of 5.5.

Without braces, it’s not too difficult to clean away most of the residue from soda by sticking to the standard oral hygiene regimen of brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. With braces, there are countless additional tiny, hard-to-reach caverns where bacteria can flourish, feasting on the sugar left behind by soda and destroying your tooth enamel.

You may not even be aware of the damage until your braces come off and you find yourself with obvious white stains around where your brackets used to be. For the sake of your teeth (not to mention your overall health), it might be time to cut soda out of your diet.

If You Must…

Giving up soda can be hard, but there are a couple of ways to reduce its effects on your teeth if you can’t quit drinking it entirely.

  • Drink through a straw. When you use a straw, the soda has minimal contact with your teeth. It’s the same reason that drinking through a straw makes it easier to enjoy a cold drink if your teeth are sensitive to low temperatures.
  • Don’t just take little sips! The longer you take to drink something sugary and acidic, the longer your teeth are exposed to enamel-destroying substances.
  • Don’t have a soda by itself; drink it with a meal instead, and follow it up with a drink of water to rinse the soda off your teeth.

Take Care Of Those Smiles!

We love our patients, and we want all of you to love your smiles when those braces come off. Don’t let fizzy drinks be your downfall! If you have any questions about the effects of soda on your teeth, please contact us.

Thank you for being a part of our practice family!

 

Contact us to schedule your complimentary orthodontic evaluation today!

 

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555
 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions

YOUR SMILE IS AN expression of who you are. It is that special thing that greets a friend, celebrates all of life’s joyful moments, and makes someone’s day that much brighter. We know how important your smile is to you and those around you. That’s why Dr. Chris Wermerson is a member of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO), so we can always provide the best and most up-to-date care to our patients!

 

What Is The AAO?

All orthodontists are dentists, but not all dentists are orthodontists. Orthodontists go to four years of dental school, and beyond that, two to three more years of school to specialize in orthodontics. We are experts in straightening and aligning teeth to create healthy, beautiful smiles for all of our patients.

The American Association of Orthodontists is the world’s oldest and largest dental specialty organization. Only the orthodontists that have received a rigorous education at an accredited orthodontics specialty program can be granted membership in the AAO. Because Dr. Wermerson is an AAO member, you can trust that all orthodontic treatment performed at our practice meets the highest standards of quality, ethics and aesthetics.

We Go The Extra Mile For Our Patients

Our number one priority is our patients’ safety and satisfaction. We’re always willing to go the extra mile to ensure that we are providing the best care to every single person who comes into our office!

As an AAO member, Dr. Chris Wermerson is constantly improving his skills and learning how to better serve you. Why? Because you deserve the smile of your dreams, and we’re here to make that dream a reality!

Thank you for choosing our practice!

 

Contact us to schedule your complimentary orthodontic evaluation today!

 

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555
 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions