Wermerson Orthodontics Blog

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Is Invisalign Right For You?

The time when getting braces meant spending years with a mouth full of metal that hooked to bulky headgear is long past. These days, traditional wire braces are more streamlined and discreet, but the option that has become increasingly popular for orthodontic treatment is Invisalign. How can you know if this option is right for you? Here are a few questions you can ask to find out.

 

What Orthodontic Problems Do Invisalign Correct?

Invisalign is great for correcting issues with dental crowding. However, because they are removable and not anchored to any of your teeth, they can’t do much for problems with the bite or with jaw alignment. For those, you’ll still need traditional braces

 

How Long Will Invisalign Treatment Take?

Treatment time with Invisalign tends to be about the same as with traditional braces. How long it takes depends much more on what kind of issue is being corrected than what type of orthodontic treatment you’re using. Some problems simply take more time to correct, but no matter what, it’s worth it in the end!

 

Does Invisalign Work For Adults?

Invisalign is a great option for adults seeking to straighten their smiles. Traditional wire braces aren’t a very appealing prospect for many adults, because culturally we tend to associate them with teenagers. However, Invisalign is barely noticeable. They also don’t have the same teenage connotation, so adults can wear them without any worries!

 

What Should I Expect With My Treatment?

Invisalign works in stages. You’ll receive a series of custom designed aligners that each moves your teeth closer towards the final goal. Similar to how traditional braces patients come in on a regular basis to have their progress assessed and their braces adjusted, Invisalign patients will receive their next set of aligner trays each time until they’re done. For either type of treatment, it’s important not to miss those appointments!

 

Still Have Questions? Just Ask Wermerson Orthodontics!

Anyone who is considering getting orthodontic treatment — Invisalign or traditional wire braces — surely has more than these four questions to ask, but that’s why Wermerson Orthodontics is here for you! Simply schedule a complimentary consultation with us and together we’ll be able to find out which type of treatment is perfect for you!

 

We look forward to seeing you smile!


Call us today to schedule a consultation with Dr. Chris Wermerson.

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions

 

Interceptive Orthodontics: The Basics

 

When we picture someone with braces, we usually picture a teenager with a mouthful of colorful brackets. What we don’t typically picture is orthodontic appliances on younger children. However, interceptive orthodontics can reduce the need for tooth extraction and jaw surgery, correct certain problems as they appear, encourage better facial development, shorten the length of orthodontic treatment needed later on, and leave patients with a better overall result in the end.

 

Interceptive Orthodontics Heads Off Problems Early

Conventional wisdom argues that orthodontic treatment shouldn’t start until all the adult teeth have grown in, but some issues with bite, alignment, and facial development can show up long before those teeth do. That’s where interceptive or “Phase 1” orthodontics comes in. Dr. Chris Wermerson can help your child’s jaw bones grow properly to have more room for the adult teeth and provide the structure for a healthier bite. Correcting problems like malocclusions (bad bites) as they appear makes future orthodontic treatment much faster and easier — and, in some cases, unnecessary!

 

Causes Of Malocclusions In Children

Interceptive orthodontics seeks to correct problems with jaw growth and damage from harmful habits such as thumb sucking, nail biting, tongue thrusting, and mouth breathing. Each of these habits contributes to bite problems such as a narrow upper arch, an underdeveloped lower jaw, a deep bite, and an open bite, as well as dental crowding, which in turn can make it difficult to chew and swallow effectively and speak clearly. The purpose of Phase 1 treatment is to stop those habits if they persist or repair the damage so that the adult teeth can grow in where they should.

 

Common Phase 1 Treatments

One of the most noticeable differences between Phase 1 and Phase 2 orthodontics is that Phase 1 is less focused on actual braces. Those typically come later, if they are still needed. Some of the treatments commonly used in Phase 1 include:

  • Upper jaw expansion to eliminate a crossbite
  • Expansion of one or both jaws to create more room for adult teeth
  • Early extraction of specific baby teeth to help adult teeth come in properly
  • Keeping space open for permanent teeth after premature loss of a baby tooth
  • Reduction of upper front teeth protrusion to protect from trauma

 

Is Your Child A Candidate For Interceptive Orthodontics?

Phase 1 orthodontics works better for correcting some problems than others. The best way you can find out if it can help your child get the healthy, properly aligned smile they deserve is to bring them in to Wermerson Orthodontics for a complementary orthodontic consultation around age 7 — especially if you’ve noticed any obvious bite problems or if they have one or more of those harmful oral health habits. In the meantime, keep encouraging them to do their brushing and flossing!

 

We look forward to seeing you smile!

 

Call us today to schedule a consultation with Dr. Chris Wermerson.

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555
 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions

 

 

Teeth and Braces – Friendly Halloween Treats

Halloween is a ton of fun every year, and it’s right around the corner! We love the costumes, the decorations, and the local events, but we’re a little wary of all that candy. Sugar isn’t just tasty to us; the harmful bacteria in our mouths love it. If you want to make Halloween a little healthier for your teeth (and safer for your braces), Dr. Chris Wermerson has a handy breakdown of how different types of treats and canies rank in terms of promoting good dental health.

 

Types of Halloween Candy to Avoid

Anything hard, sticky, or sour is going to be bad for your teeth. Hard candy takes a while to dissolve, which means your teeth are exposed to sugar for a long time, and it can easily break a bracket loose. Even the nuts in soft candy bars pose a risk.

Sticky candy is a problem because it adheres to the teeth and braces, pushing the sugar right up against the enamel and gum tissue. That’s like breakfast in bed for bacteria! Sour candy might not pose the same dangers to your brackets, but it contains acid as well as sugar, so it’s doubly bad for teeth.

 

Candy That’s Good for Teeth?

Not all candy is awful for oral health or dangerous for braces. Chocolate is on the good end of the oral health spectrum, and the darker, the better. Chocolate contains flavonoids and polyphenols — compounds that limit oral bacteria, fight bad breath, and slow tooth decay. Dark chocolate has more of these compounds and their benefits are less offset by sugar than in sweeter milk chocolate.

Other candies that are safe to eat with braces and not terrible for your teeth include mint patties, peanut butter cups, and nut-free chocolate bars. These are soft and not too sticky, so you can safely bite into them without risking a bracket and an extra trip to Wermerson Orthodontics.

 

Fight Back Against the Effects of Sugar

Aside from avoiding the more harmful candies in favor of chocolate, there are other ways we can combat the effects sugar has on our teeth:

  • Don’t give harmful oral bacteria an all-day buffet! If you’re planning on eating a lot of candy, it’s better to eat it all in one sitting than spreading it out across an entire day. This way, your saliva will have a chance to neutralize the acids and wash away leftover sugar.
  • Drink water after enjoying some candy. It will help rinse out the sugar sticking to your teeth.
  • Wait half an hour after eating candy, then brush your teeth! Good brushing and flossing habits are essential to protecting your teeth from the effects of sugary candy.

Another Great Resource Is Wermerson Orthodontics!

Being careful about which candy you eat and when, rinsing with water, and maintaining good daily brushing and flossing habits are all great, but don’t forget about the best resource you have: Wermerson Orthodontics! If you’d like to learn more about which treats are healthiest for your teeth and safest for your braces, all you have to do is ask!

 

Have a happy, healthy Halloween!

 

Call us today to schedule a consultation with Dr. Chris Wermerson.

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions

MAINTAINING GOOD DENTAL health isn’t just about the quantity of your brushing — it’s also about the quality. There are several mistakes many of us make when brushing our teeth, whether because we’re using the wrong tools or because we’re using the right tools the wrong way.

1. Keeping A Toothbrush Too Long

How long has it been since you got a new toothbrush? The American Dental Association recommends replacing your toothbrush at least three times a year, because broken, frayed bristles can’t do as good of a job of keeping your teeth clean.

2. Racing Through Your Brushing

The average time people spend brushing their teeth is 45 seconds, which obviously falls far short of the full two minutes recommended. If you’re having trouble making it through two whole minutes, try setting a timer or playing a song.

3. Brushing Too Hard

You might assume that the harder you brush, the cleaner your teeth will get, but you really only need gentle pressure to scrub the leftover food and bacteria away. If you brush much harder than that, you risk damaging your gum tissue.

4. Using A Hard-Bristled Brush

Like brushing too hard, using a toothbrush with hard bristles can do more harm than good, especially to gum tissue. Talk to us if you’re not sure which type of bristles your toothbrush should have.

5. Brushing Immediately After Eating

A common mistake people make when they’re trying to take good care of their teeth is to immediately brush them after a meal. Acidic foods and drinks temporarily weaken our tooth enamel, and brushing right away can cause damage. This is why we should wait at least half an hour to brush so that our saliva has time to neutralize things.

6. Poor Toothbrush Storage

Is your toothbrush smelly? Do you store it somewhere it can get plenty of air, or do you put it in a case where it never really dries out? Bacteria love moist environments, so the best thing we can do to keep our toothbrushes clean is to store them upright somewhere they can air dry between uses.

7. Bad Brushing Technique

Even brushing for two full minutes twice a day with the best toothbrush with the perfect bristle firmness won’t do much for your teeth if your technique is off. Remember that you’re brushing to get plaque and food particles out of the gumline, so hold your brush at a 45° angle to the gums and gently sweep the bristles in small circular motions. Do this at least 15 times in each area of the mouth, on the tongue side and outside of the teeth, and don’t forget the chewing surfaces!

Come To Us With Your Tooth Brushing Questions

If you want to learn more about good brushing technique, toothbrush storage, or how to pick the perfect toothbrush for you, just give us a call! We want to make sure that all of our patients have the right tools and knowledge to keep their teeth healthy for life!

We look forward to seeing you at your next appointment!

 

Contact us to schedule your complimentary orthodontic evaluation today!

 

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555
 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions

What’s In That Drink?

You probably already know that soda is chock full of sugar, but did you know that it’s also highly acidic? For reference, stomach acid, one of the strongest acids, has a pH of 1.5, whereas water is neutral at a pH of 7. Soda ranges in acidity from RC Cola with a pH of 2.387 to Mug root beer with a pH of 4.038. The strong acidity from citric and phosphoric acids is actually the reason for all the sugar—without it, soda would be too sour to drink!

Effects On Teeth

The sugar and acid in soda launch a two-pronged attack on your oral health. Sugar is bacteria’s favorite food, so you’re giving the bacteria in your mouth a feast when you drink anything full of sugar, which allows them to reproduce faster. You’ll end up with bad breath and a higher risk of cavities as a result.

As for the acid, the protective enamel coating your teeth is vulnerable from the first swig. Even the least acidic sodas like root beer aren’t safe, because enamel begins to dissolve at a pH of 5.5.

Without braces, it’s not too difficult to clean away most of the residue from soda by sticking to the standard oral hygiene regimen of brushing twice a day and flossing once a day. With braces, there are countless additional tiny, hard-to-reach caverns where bacteria can flourish, feasting on the sugar left behind by soda and destroying your tooth enamel.

You may not even be aware of the damage until your braces come off and you find yourself with obvious white stains around where your brackets used to be. For the sake of your teeth (not to mention your overall health), it might be time to cut soda out of your diet.

If You Must…

Giving up soda can be hard, but there are a couple of ways to reduce its effects on your teeth if you can’t quit drinking it entirely.

  • Drink through a straw. When you use a straw, the soda has minimal contact with your teeth. It’s the same reason that drinking through a straw makes it easier to enjoy a cold drink if your teeth are sensitive to low temperatures.
  • Don’t just take little sips! The longer you take to drink something sugary and acidic, the longer your teeth are exposed to enamel-destroying substances.
  • Don’t have a soda by itself; drink it with a meal instead, and follow it up with a drink of water to rinse the soda off your teeth.

Take Care Of Those Smiles!

We love our patients, and we want all of you to love your smiles when those braces come off. Don’t let fizzy drinks be your downfall! If you have any questions about the effects of soda on your teeth, please contact us.

Thank you for being a part of our practice family!

 

Contact us to schedule your complimentary orthodontic evaluation today!

 

Dr. Chris Wermerson, DMD, MS
Wermerson Orthodontics
605-274-0555
 

Wermerson Orthodontics is a member of the American Association of Orthodontics
 

Dr. Wermerson is a Board Certified Orthodontist and member of the AAO, which has 17,000 members in the United States, Canada and abroad. Orthodontists are uniquely qualified specialists who correct improperly aligned teeth and jaws (bad bites).  They receive an additional two to three years of specialized education beyond dental school to learn the proper way to align and straighten teeth.  Only those with this formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the AAO.  Visit the AAO online at www.mylifemysmile.org.

 

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions